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  • AIDS Diagnosis
  • Chlamydia Diagnosis
  • Diagnosis of UTI
  • Flu Diagnosis
  • Food Poisoning Diagnosis
  • H1N1 Diagnosis
  • Hepatitis Diagnosis
  • Herpes Diagnosis
  • Influenza Diagnosis
  • Kidney Infection Diagnosis
  • Malarial Diagnosis
  • Meningitis Diagnosis
  • Rash Diagnosis
  • Swine flu diagnosis
  • Syphilis Diagnosis
  •  

3rd International Conference on Influenza and Emerging Infectious Diseases, will be organized around the theme “Conceptual Applications to encounter the Infectious Diseases”

Influenza Research 2019 is comprised of keynote and speakers sessions on latest cutting edge research designed to offer comprehensive global discussions that address current issues in Influenza Research 2019

Submit your abstract to any of the mentioned tracks.

Register now for the conference by choosing an appropriate package suitable to you.

  • Track 1-1Hijack of human cells by influenza (Flu) virus
  • Track 1-2Promising influenza study tools
  • Track 1-3Spanish Influenza (Flu)
  • Track 1-4Pandemic Influenza (Flu)
  • Track 1-5Avian Influenza (Flu)
  • Track 1-6Influenza Surveillance & Response System
  • Track 1-7Prognosis of Influenza (Flu)
  • Track 1-8Risks and complications of Influenza (Flu)
  • Track 1-9Zoonotic Influenza (Flu)
  • Track 1-10Prevalence of Influenza (Flu)
  • Track 1-11Symptoms and Signs of Influenza (Flu)
  • Track 1-12Pneumonia following influenza
  • Track 1-13Influenza vaccination-natural immunity
  • Track 1-14Influenza vaccination-natural immunity
  • Track 1-15Influenza (Flu) virus-like particles
  • Track 1-16Treatment & prevention of influenza (Flu)
  • Track 1-17Hijack of human cells by influenza (Flu) virus
  • Track 1-18Influenza (Flu)-heart attack
  • Track 1-19Epidemiology of Influenza (flu) infectious Diseased
  • Track 1-20Seasonal epidemics of Influenza (Flu)
  • Track 1-21Avian Influenza (Flu)
  • Track 1-22MRSA-superbug-influenza
  • Track 1-23Inhibitors of influenza virus
  • Track 1-24Occurrence of Influenza (Flu)
  • Track 2-1Effects of fungal infections on beverage products
  • Track 2-2Impact of Fungal infections in lung transplantations
  • Track 2-3Molecular techniques to combat fungal infections
  • Track 2-4Sleeping Beauty and fungal infection
  • Track 2-5Physiology of infectious fungi
  • Track 2-6Algorithm to predict drug combinations against fungal resistance
  • Track 2-7Prevalence and surveillance of fungal infections
  • Track 2-8Symptoms of a fungal infectious disease
  • Track 2-9Types of fungal infectious diseases
  • Track 2-10Heart Drug impact on chronic fungal infections
  • Track 2-11Model systems to study fungal infections
  • Track 2-12Genetic susceptibility to fungal diseases
  • Track 2-13Immune defense against fungal infections
  • Track 2-14Diagnosis and treatment of fungal infections
  • Track 2-15Fungal infections and inflammatory responses
  • Track 2-16Plant defense against fungal infections
  • Track 2-17Emerging fungal infectious diseases and cancers
  • Track 2-18Prevention of fungal infectious diseases
  • Track 2-19Fungal infections and drug resistance
  • Track 2-20Causes of fungal infectious diseases
  • Track 3-1Clinical and medical epidemiology
  • Track 3-2Food borne diseases
  • Track 3-3Biodiversity loss
  • Track 3-4Agricultural Development
  • Track 3-5Changes in Human Demographics and Behavior
  • Track 3-6International Travel and Commerce
  • Track 3-7Technology and Industry
  • Track 3-8Microbial Adaptation and Change
  • Track 3-9Breakdown of Public Health Measures
  • Track 3-10Deficiencies in public health infrastructure
  • Track 3-11Epidemic-Prone Diseases
  • Track 3-12Geographical distribution of infectious diseases
  • Track 3-13Denizens of the microbial world
  • Track 3-14Epidemiological methods
  • Track 3-15Control of infectious disease
  • Track 3-16Molecular epidemiology
  • Track 3-17Cohort studies
  • Track 3-18Descriptive infectious disease epidemiology
  • Track 3-19Emerging pandemic threats
  • Track 3-20Dynamics of Infectious diseases
  • Track 3-21Disease Eradication
  • Track 3-22Spread and evolution of infectious diseases
  • Track 3-23Prevalence of the fungus Fusarium
  • Track 4-1Medical microbiology
  • Track 4-2Cholera
  • Track 4-3Rabies
  • Track 4-4Smallpox
  • Track 4-5Bubonic Plague
  • Track 4-6Pneumonia
  • Track 4-7Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease
  • Track 4-8Marburg hemorraghic fever
  • Track 4-9Yellow Fever
  • Track 4-10Perinatal Complications
  • Track 4-11Whooping Cough
  • Track 4-12Tetanus
  • Track 4-13Anti-tumor mechanisms & cancer
  • Track 4-14Anthrax
  • Track 4-15Zika virus infection
  • Track 4-16Diagnosis & Management
  • Track 4-17Clinical Syndrome
  • Track 4-18Clinical microbiology
  • Track 4-19Malaria
  • Track 4-20Dengue infection
  • Track 4-21HIV/AIDS
  • Track 4-22Streptococcus infection
  • Track 4-23Ear infections
  • Track 4-24Infectious Diarrhea
  • Track 4-25Ebola
  • Track 4-26Hepatitis
  • Track 4-27Zika virus infection
  • Track 4-28Preventing spread of drug-resistant bacteria
  • Track 5-1Anatomical pathology
  • Track 5-2Clinical pathology
  • Track 5-3Molecular pathology
  • Track 5-4Oral and maxillofacial pathology
  • Track 5-5Veterinary pathology
  • Track 5-6Plant pathology
  • Track 5-7Dermatophyte infections
  • Track 5-8Outbreaks and investigations
  • Track 6-1Antigenic Shift
  • Track 6-2Immunological studies of pathogenic bacteria
  • Track 6-3Physiology of pathogenic bacteria
  • Track 6-4Genetic transformation pathogenic bacteria
  • Track 6-5Clinical Characteristics of pathogenic bacterial infections
  • Track 6-6Pathogenic bacteria survival in host
  • Track 6-7Identification of pathogenic bacteria
  • Track 6-8Treatment for bacterial infectious diseases
  • Track 6-91 Bacterial Infection prevention
  • Track 6-10Obligate extracellular
  • Track 6-11Facultative extracellular pathogenic bacteria
  • Track 6-12Extracellular pathogenic bactiria
  • Track 6-13Obligate intracellular pathogenic bacteria
  • Track 6-14Facultative intracellular pathogenic bacteria
  • Track 6-15Intracellular pathogenic bacteria
  • Track 6-16Causes of Foodborne Illness
  • Track 6-17Antigenic Drift
  • Track 6-18Biochemical studies of pathogenic bacteria
  • Track 7-1Anatomical Pathology
  • Track 7-2Supercharged antibiotics
  • Track 7-3Conventional Antibiotics
  • Track 7-4Antimicrobial gel
  • Track 7-5Multidrug resistant bacteria
  • Track 7-6Regulation of antimicrobial ingredients
  • Track 7-7Antimicrobial resistance in zoonotic bacteria
  • Track 7-8Antimicrobial peptides
  • Track 7-9Antimicrobial use in cosmetics and detergents
  • Track 7-10Plasmids in antibiotic preserve
  • Track 7-11Antivirals
  • Track 7-12 Specific mechanisms of host resistance
  • Track 7-13Antimicrobial effects
  • Track 7-14Promising new antimicrobials
  • Track 7-15New generation antibiotics and antimicrobials
  • Track 7-16Antimicrobial bullets
  • Track 7-17Bacterial mechanisms against antibiotics
  • Track 7-18Antibiotics
  • Track 7-19Antifungals
  • Track 7-20Antibiotic resistant bacteria
  • Track 8-1Infectious Viruses and pathogenicity
  • Track 8-2Environmental forces-biological molecules-viral infections
  • Track 8-3Alcohol effect on body against viral infections
  • Track 8-4Transmission of viral infectious diseases
  • Track 8-5Impact of obesity on viral infection transmission
  • Track 8-6Stress & Depression influence viral infectious diseases
  • Track 8-7Proteins and viral infectious diseases
  • Track 8-8Therapeutics for viral infectious diseases
  • Track 8-9Mucocutaneous & Zika virus infection
  • Track 8-10Genetic risk-viral infectious disease
  • Track 8-11Viruses against viral infectious diseases
  • Track 8-12Prototype drug to treat viral disease
  • Track 8-13Mutations-vulnerable viral infections
  • Track 8-14Immune factors and viral infections
  • Track 8-15 Mechanism to control viral infections
  • Track 8-16Potential biomarkers
  • Track 8-17Treatment and prevention of viral infectious diseases
  • Track 8-18 Impact of viral Infectious diseases
  • Track 8-19Incidence of viral infectious diseases
  • Track 8-20Consequences of viral infectious diseases
  • Track 8-21Unconventional immune cell capability
  • Track 8-22Antibiotic resistance
  • Track 8-23 Acute viral infections
  • Track 8-24Diagnosis of viral infectious diseases
  • Track 8-25Tools to distinguish viral & bacterial infections
  • Track 9-1Epidemiology of infections in Cancer patients
  • Track 9-2Cancer associated bacterial infections
  • Track 9-3Fusing/Anchoring of viruses in genetic material
  • Track 9-4Cancer drug effects on viral infected cells
  • Track 9-5Pathways of Infections-Cancers
  • Track 9-6Antibiotic effects on Cancer cells
  • Track 9-7Stem cells - bacteria - cancer
  • Track 9-8Stem cells - bacteria - cancer
  • Track 9-9Photosensitizers in treatment of Infections & cancers
  • Track 9-10Microbiota impact on Infections during Cancer Treatment
  • Track 9-11Helminths Infection associated Cancers
  • Track 9-12Cancer associated viral infections
  • Track 9-13Cancer associated fungal infections
  • Track 9-14Potential molecules to combat cancer & infections
  • Track 9-15Infectious Complications in Cancer patients
  • Track 9-16Advancements in the Management of Viral Infections
  • Track 9-17Adjuvants and their improvement issues
  • Track 9-18Clinical trails of influenza based vaccines
  • Track 9-19Bloodstream Infections in cancer patients
  • Track 9-20Infections in Solid tumor patients
  • Track 9-21Postsurgery Infections in Cancer patients
  • Track 9-22Influenza (Flu) infection in birds
  • Track 9-23Immunity in cancers and infections
  • Track 9-24Human papillomavirus (HPV) infections & cancer risks
  • Track 9-25Non-oncogenic infections
  • Track 10-1Presurgical Multifaceted intervention
  • Track 10-2Occurrence of hospital acquired infections
  • Track 10-3Treatment and prevention of hospital acquired infections
  • Track 10-4Catheter related bloodstream infections
  • Track 10-5Emergency and essential health care
  • Track 10-6Leading pathogens causing hospital acquired infection
  • Track 10-7Chlorhexidine gluconate bath usage
  • Track 10-8Screening tools
  • Track 10-9Gene Technology to fight against hospital acquired infection
  • Track 10-10Risk factors in Hospital acquired infetions
  • Track 10-11Wound contamination and surgical site infections
  • Track 10-12Ventilator associated pneumonia
  • Track 10-13Informatics tools
  • Track 10-14Level hospital infection risk
  • Track 10-15Molecular network
  • Track 10-16Nanofiber-based wound dressings
  • Track 10-17Multidrug resistant infections
  • Track 10-18Nosocomial infection
  • Track 10-19Xenotransplantation and transplantation
  • Track 10-20Surgical site infections
  • Track 10-21Epidemiology of hospital acquired infections

 

 

 

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  • Track 11-1Pediatric Immunizations
  • Track 11-2Bacterial infectious diseases
  • Track 11-3Viral infectious diseases
  • Track 11-4Pneumonia in children
  • Track 11-5Metapneumoviral infection
  • Track 11-6Abnormal pregnancies-fetal death
  • Track 11-7Immunocompromise
  • Track 11-8Chlamydia trachomatis
  • Track 11-9Infection control & prevention
  • Track 11-10Antibiotic gel-ear infections
  • Track 11-11Staph bone infections
  • Track 11-12Childhood infections
  • Track 11-13Kawasaki Disease
  • Track 11-14Infections of the Fetus
  • Track 11-15Acquired Neonatal Infections
  • Track 11-16Infectious Disease in Child Abuse
  • Track 11-17Clinical Approach to the infected Neonate
  • Track 11-18Mechanism of Pediatric Infectious Disease
  • Track 11-19Pediatric HIV
  • Track 11-20Effects of antibiotics in children
  • Track 11-21Multi-drug resistant infections
  • Track 11-22Lyme disease
  • Track 11-23Fungal infections
  • Track 11-24Atopic dermatitis
  • Track 12-1Gastroenteritis
  • Track 12-2Hepatobiliary system infectious diseases
  • Track 12-3Bile salt-protective biofilms-pathogen
  • Track 12-4Micromotors to treat infections in the stomach
  • Track 12-5Weight loss surgery associated GI diseases
  • Track 12-6Synthetic stool to treat GI infections
  • Track 12-7Psychological factors and the immune system associated complications
  • Track 12-8Peptic ulcers and stomach cancer
  • Track 12-9Bacterial toxin associated gastrointestinal infections
  • Track 12-10Host-microbe interaction models (organoids)
  • Track 12-11Gut microbes as future therapeutics
  • Track 12-12Equine GI Disease
  • Track 12-13Hepatic disease in Rheumatoid Arthritis
  • Track 12-14Giardiasis: causes, symptoms & treatment
  • Track 12-15Diagnosis & Management of GTI
  • Track 12-16Infalmmatory Enteritis
  • Track 12-17Pancreatic Infections
  • Track 12-18Prevention of Gastroenteritis Pathogens
  • Track 12-19Clostridium difficile infection
  • Track 12-20Engineered human gastrointestinal cultures
  • Track 12-21Antibiotic associated GI infections
  • Track 12-22Acid suppression medications
  • Track 12-23Emerging fungal infections-Cancer
  • Track 12-24Imbalance of intestinal microbiota
  • Track 12-25Histopathology of infectious disease of the gastrointestinal tract

These are conditions usually caused by infections that can affect the genital area and urinary system: Some infections are caught from another person, usually during sex. Other cases are caused when organisms (bacteria or yeast), which are usually present in small numbers, overgrow and cause symptoms. Some genitourinary (GU) diseases are caused by bacteria that do not cause problems in their usual home in the body, but do if they get into another place.

  • Track 13-1Assays and symptoms
  • Track 13-2Dogs & other animals in detection of agricultural diseases
  • Track 13-3Foodborne illness & common agricultural practice
  • Track 13-4Plant biosecurity
  • Track 13-5Molecular mechanism of plant pathogens
  • Track 13-6Cross species gene regulation
  • Track 13-7Agriculture-honey bees
  • Track 13-8Resistance of plants
  • Track 13-9Nanotechnology for sustainable agriculture
  • Track 13-10Entomopathogenic Nematodes, Fungi, Bacteria & Virus
  • Track 13-11Genetically modified pigs & veterinary animals
  • Track 13-12Genetic diversity in agriculture to limit infectious disease
  • Track 13-13Flu & other infectious diseases in veterinary animals & humans
  • Track 13-14Rapid detection methods by PCR
  • Track 13-15Strain identification assays and rapid diagnostic testing for viral infections
  • Track 13-16Biomarkers
  • Track 13-17Diseases with bioterrorism potential
  • Track 13-18Undetectable pathogens
  • Track 13-19Synthetic pesticides & herbicides-natural herbicide
  • Track 13-20Livestock-emerging infectious diseases
  • Track 13-21Antibiotics & chemicals usage in agriculture associated Infectious diseases
  • Track 13-22Risk factors- drug resistant infectious diseases
  • Track 13-23Agricultural interventions & infectious diseases
  • Track 13-24Influenza infections among agriculture workers

 

 

 

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  • Track 14-1Microbial transmission
  • Track 14-2Common Parasitic Infections
  • Track 14-3Microbiome impact on sexually transmitted disease
  • Track 14-4Vital Role of Hormones in STDs
  • Track 14-5Interventions to prevent STDs
  • Track 14-6Animal model for STDs studies
  • Track 14-7Epidemiology of STDs
  • Track 14-8ADHD medications impact on STDs
  • Track 14-9Link Between STDs & Heart Disease
  • Track 14-10STDs & Monogamists (Monogamy)
  • Track 14-11Sexually transmitted diseases among psychiatric patients
  • Track 14-12Diagnosis & Treatment of STDs
  • Track 14-13Genome Analysis of Parasites associated STDs
  • Track 14-14HIV/AIDS
  • Track 14-15Contraceptives
  • Track 14-16Epidemiological Diagnosis
  • Track 14-17Partner Therapy
  • Track 14-18Vaccines & Treatments for STDs
  • Track 14-19Anorectal Infectious Diseases
  • Track 14-20Protiens in Protection against sexually transmitted diseases
  • Track 14-21Novel prevention program to Combate STDs
  • Track 14-22Prevalence of STDs
  • Track 14-23Risk factors of STDs
  • Track 14-24Neglected Sexually Transmitted Diseases
  • Track 15-1Nervous System Infections
  • Track 15-2Tapeworm & brain infections
  • Track 15-3Immunological memory of the brain
  • Track 15-4Potential diagnostic & prognostic tools
  • Track 15-5Autoimmune skin disease & neurologic disorders
  • Track 15-6Acute viral infections & sensory polyneuropathy
  • Track 15-7Disease fighting cells in viral infection related neurological disorders
  • Track 15-8Memory loss & neurological problems
  • Track 15-9Neurological illness and their affect on limbs
  • Track 15-10Zika infection & Guillain-Barre syndrome
  • Track 15-11Zika virus & neurological problems
  • Track 15-12Early HIV infection & neurological coplications
  • Track 15-13Etological Agents
  • Track 15-14Diagnosis & Prevention
  • Track 15-15Infections after neurological operations
  • Track 15-16Neurological aspects of Infectious Diesase
  • Track 15-17Types of Neurological Infections
  • Track 15-18Diagnosis and Treatment
  • Track 15-19Ebola & neurological complications
  • Track 15-20Ear infections & neurological complications
  • Track 15-21Infection maintain active antibodies against pathogens
  • Track 15-22Brain tapeworm infection
  • Track 16-1Cutaneous, Subcutaneous Infections
  • Track 16-2Contagious skin infections
  • Track 16-3Exercise-Related Skin infectious Diseases
  • Track 16-4Styling practices & serious hair and scalp diseases
  • Track 16-5Styling practices & serious hair and scalp diseases
  • Track 16-6immune system & MRSA infections
  • Track 16-7Exposure to aquariums associated Skin infections
  • Track 16-8Psoriasis
  • Track 16-9Nasal bacteria & skin infections
  • Track 16-10Cannabinoids for certain skin diseases
  • Track 16-11Cannabinoids for certain skin diseases
  • Track 16-12Parasitic Infestations
  • Track 16-13Soft tissue Infections
  • Track 16-14Dermatologic Manifestations of Infections
  • Track 16-15Cellulitis & Myositis
  • Track 16-16Fungal skin infections
  • Track 16-17Complications of overuse of antibiotics
  • Track 16-18 Lyme disease
  • Track 16-19Antibitic alternatives in treatment of skin
  • Track 16-20Prevalence of genital herpes
  • Track 17-1Cystic Fibrosis Pulmonary Infections
  • Track 17-2Asthma treatment
  • Track 17-3Vaccines vs antibiotics
  • Track 17-4Cigarette smoke effect on respiratory system
  • Track 17-5Inhaled steroid effect on respiratory system
  • Track 17-6Zinc supply mechanism role in lung infections
  • Track 17-7Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis
  • Track 17-8Lung organoids
  • Track 17-9Aerosol effect on Respiratory system
  • Track 17-10Cystic fibrosis-lung infections
  • Track 17-11Liver role in pneumonia
  • Track 17-12Prevalence of lung diseases in diabetes people
  • Track 17-13Valley fever
  • Track 17-14Reprogramming immune cells to encounter TB
  • Track 17-15Risk factors to occur lung infections
  • Track 17-16Community Accquired Pneumonia
  • Track 17-17Atypical Pulmonary Infections
  • Track 17-18Upper Airway Infections
  • Track 17-19Lower Airway Infections
  • Track 17-20Diagnosis, prevention and medication of lung diseases
  • Track 17-21Tonsil & adenoid role in respiration
  • Track 17-22Congenital lung disorders
  • Track 17-23Pulmonary fungal infections
  • Track 17-24Tuberculosis (TB) Pulmonary Diseases
  • Track 17-25Defense Mechanisms of the respiratory System
  • Track 17-26Lung infections in leukemia patients
  • Track 17-27Chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases
  • Track 17-28Excessive Sweating & Skin Infections

 

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  • Track 18-1Ocular Infections
  • Track 18-2Artists and eye diseases
  • Track 18-3Early detection of eye diseases
  • Track 18-4Congenital Zika virus syndrome
  • Track 18-5Endophthalmitis
  • Track 18-6Algorithms to detect eye diseases
  • Track 18-7Corneal inflammation
  • Track 18-8Corneal inflammation
  • Track 18-9Microcephaly
  • Track 18-10Smoking effect on eyes
  • Track 18-11Detection, prevention & medication of Glaucoma
  • Track 18-12Electronic health records (EHR)
  • Track 18-13Healthy diet medication to lower eye disease risk
  • Track 18-14Risk factors for ophthalmoscopic
  • Track 18-15Personalize diagnosis and treatment of eye diseases
  • Track 18-16Immunotherapy & antiviral therapy
  • Track 18-17Brain diseases-pathological changes in the retina
  • Track 18-18Immuno-ophthalmology
  • Track 18-19Molecular Diagnosis & Treatments
  • Track 18-20Infection of the Posterior Segment
  • Track 18-21Emergent Ocular Infections
  • Track 18-22Conjunctivitis
  • Track 18-23Therapies & Treatments
  • Track 18-24Eye diseases-sleep disorders
  • Track 18-25Microbial keratitis
  • Track 18-26Retinal diseases
  • Track 18-27Corneal transplants
  • Track 18-28Eye microbiota
  • Track 18-29 Toxoplasma infection
  • Track 18-30 Toxoplasma infection
  • Track 18-31Contact lens and eye infections
  • Track 18-32Drugs and eye disorders
  • Track 19-1Parthenogenesis and Virulence in Zoonoses
  • Track 19-2Rodent-borne zoonotic diseases
  • Track 19-3Monitoring of zoonotic diseases
  • Track 19-4Wildlife and climate roles in zoonotic diseases
  • Track 19-5Influential geo-spatial factors of zoonotic diseases
  • Track 19-6Species-jumping infectious diseases
  • Track 19-7Models for infectious disease studies
  • Track 19-8 Zoonotic Viruses
  • Track 19-9Wildlife disease & wildlife conservation
  • Track 19-10Antimicrobial resistance in zoonotic bacteria
  • Track 19-11Detection of human-animal diseases
  • Track 19-12Veterinary medicine
  • Track 19-13Globalization zoonotic diseases
  • Track 19-14Tick-borne zoonotic diseases
  • Track 19-15Emerging zoonotic diseases from pets
  • Track 19-16Xenotransplantation
  • Track 19-17Food-borne zoonotic diseases
  • Track 19-18Non-food-borne zoonotic diseases
  • Track 19-19Bioterrorism of Zoontic Diseases
  • Track 19-20Prevention and control of zoonotic diseases
  • Track 19-21Economic & trade implications
  • Track 19-22Bacterial infectious diseases
  • Track 19-23Mycotic infectious diseases
  • Track 19-24Viral infectious diseases
  • Track 19-25Emerging vector-borne zoonotic diseases
  • Track 19-26Hot-spots of human-animal zoonotic diseases and emerging disease
  • Track 19-27Prediction of zoonotic diseases outbreaks
  • Track 19-28Overabundant of wildlife communities

The explosive nature of epidemic flu and the specific clinical features of this disease have given definitive epidemiological records of this infection since the beginning of the nineteenth century. Some of the epidemics were recorded during the nineteenth century but the first pandemic was not precisely recorded until 1889-92. A second pandemic, probably originating in Europe, occurred in 1918-19, and is called as Spanish Influenza. It is responsible for 20-25 million deaths, principally in young adults. It was suggested that this strain had unusual virulence.

  • Track 21-1Microbial stowaways
  • Track 21-2Emerging Infectious diseases
  • Track 21-3Hygiene behavior and disease spread
  • Track 21-4Pandemic Infectious diseases
  • Track 21-5Management and control outbreaks of infectious diseases
  • Track 21-6Epidemic Infectious diseases
  • Track 21-7Impact of antimicrobial resistance
  • Track 21-8Promising vaccines and medications development
  • Track 21-9Opportunistic infections
  • Track 21-10 Alcohol based sanitizes to minimize microbial transmission
  • Track 21-11Diagnostic and analytic techniques
  • Track 21-12Prevention of communicable infectious diseases
  • Track 21-13Microbial contamination
  • Track 21-14Methods for decontamination
  • Track 21-15Prevalence and spread of infectious diseases
  • Track 21-16Pathogenecity of microbes
  • Track 21-17Hazardous microorganisms
  • Track 21-18 Possible contagions
  • Track 21-19Microbial pathogens
  • Track 21-20Risks of multi-drug-resistant bacteria
  • Track 21-21Damage of food packaging encourage growth of microbes
  • Track 21-22 Infections and their Impact on Global Public Health

\ Developed countries have regulations that help to protect the general public from infectious diseases. Public health measures typically involve eliminating the pathogen from the reservoir or from its route of transmission. The measures include ensuring a safe water supply, effectively managing sewage treatment and disposal, and initiating food safety, animal control, and vaccination programs. Influenza drug effectivity is evaluated in clinical trials conducted within the setting of current,  naturally occurring influenza illness. However, a drug effective within the treatment of seasonal  influenza might not be effective or as effective in pandemic influenza or in sporadic cases caused by alternative novel strains. Avian influenza, listed by the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE),  has become an illness of nice importance for animal and human health.

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  • Track 22-1Spread and Evolution of Infectious Diseases
  • Track 22-2Zoonotic Infection
  • Track 22-3Inequality, Political Ecology and the Future of Infectious Diseases
  • Track 22-4Denizens of the Microbial World
  • Track 22-5Climatic conditions for Infectious Diseases
  • Track 22-6Geographical Distribution of Infectious Diseases
  • Track 22-7Infections on Global Impact

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  • Track 23-1Vaccines: Innovations and Advancements
  • Track 23-2Point of care devices
  • Track 23-3Ultrasound
  • Track 23-4Ontology-driven clinical decision support system (IDDAP)
  • Track 23-5Telemedicine
  • Track 23-6Nano/Microfluidics
  • Track 23-7Differential diagnosis
  • Track 23-8Microbead array technology
  • Track 23-9Staining & Microscope based tests
  • Track 23-10Culture of microorganisms
  • Track 23-11Nucleic acid based tests
  • Track 23-12Alternative medicine
  • Track 23-13Antimicrobial Therapies
  • Track 23-14Antimicrobial resistance based techniques
  • Track 23-15Non nucleic acid based identification tests
  • Track 23-16Anti-Infective Therapies
  • Track 23-17Therapies & Managements
  • Track 23-18Digital Treatment Techniques
  • Track 23-19Paper diagnosis

Coinfection: Multi Pathogen Infectious Diseases is the simultaneous infection of a host by more than one pathogen species or more virus particles. Prevalence of coinfection among humans is anonymous, but it is of particular human health importance, since pathogenic strains able to cooperate within the host and coinfection results have negative effect on human health. Positive parasite interactions leads to disease transmission and progression are enhanced and this is known as syndemism, negative parasite interactions allows microbial interference, one bacterial strain overthrow the virulence or colonisation of other bacterial strain. 

  • Track 24-1Co-infection of gut pathogens
  • Track 24-2Bacteriophage coinfection
  • Track 24-3HIV-TB coinfection
  • Track 24-4HIV-HCV coinfection
  • Track 24-5Trichuriasis
  • Track 24-6Hookworm-malaria coinfection
  • Track 24-7Chikungunya and Dengue coinfection
  • Track 24-8Dengue and HIV coinfection
  • Track 24-9Chagas and HIV coinfection
  • Track 24-10Mansonella perstans
  • Track 24-11Positive coinfection
  • Track 24-12Negative coinfection
  • Track 24-13Anaplasmosis
  • Track 24-14Analysis of coinfection of food web
  • Track 24-15Diagnosis of multiple pathogens
  • Track 24-16Strategies to develop broad spectrum vaccines
  • Track 24-17Plant enzymes against multiple infections
  • Track 24-18Metagenomics for multi pathogen infections
  • Track 24-19Ecology of multi-host pathogens of animals
  • Track 24-20Novel therapeutic approaches against multiple pathogens
  • Track 24-21Multi-pathogen waterborne community
  • Track 24-22Population dynamics of multiple pathogenic infectious disease
  • Track 24-23Multi-pathogen detection respiratory tract infection
  • Track 24-24Evolutionary and Epidemiological Implications of Multiple Infection
  • Track 24-25Statistical Inference for Multi-Pathogen Systems
  • Track 24-26Agent Based Models For Infectious Disease Transmission
  • Track 24-27Polymicrobial infections
  • Track 25-1Prevalence & risk factors of NCDs
  • Track 25-2Physical inactivity associated NCDs
  • Track 25-3Gut microbiota & inflammatory NCDs
  • Track 25-4Neurology NCDs
  • Track 25-5Height influence on infectious diseases
  • Track 25-6Traditional & Noncommunicable Diseases
  • Track 25-7Determinants of Noncommunicable Diseases
  • Track 25-8Pregnancy & childbirth NCDs
  • Track 25-9Inspirations & lessons from HIV-AIDS
  • Track 25-10Microbiome & immune-host defenses in NCDs
  • Track 25-11Epigenetics & Evolution of noncommunicable diseases
  • Track 25-12Inherited noncommunicable diseases (NCDs)
  • Track 25-13Pilates of noncommunicable diseases (NCDs)
  • Track 25-14Major noncommunicable diseases (NCDs)
  • Track 25-15Immune biomarkers in NCDs
  • Track 25-16Environmental NCDs
  • Track 25-17Interventions to encounter NCDs
  • Track 25-18Surveillance of noncommunicable diseases
  • Track 25-19Detection & prevention of noncommunicable disease
  • Track 25-20Chronic noncommunicable diseases
  • Track 25-21Lifestyle related noncommunicable diseases
  • Track 26-1Food Poisoning
  • Track 26-2Nutrition to prevent foodborne illnesses
  • Track 26-3Preventing bacterial food poisoning
  • Track 26-4Food Safety and Zoonoses
  • Track 26-5Foodborne disease
  • Track 26-6Risk factors of foodborne illness
  • Track 26-7Mechanism of foodborne illness
  • Track 26-8Diagnosis of foodborne illnesses
  • Track 26-9Harmful chemicals
  • Track 26-10Treatment of foodborne illnesses
  • Track 26-11Zoonoses and the environment
  • Track 26-12Complications of foodborne illnesses
  • Track 26-13Mycotoxins and alimentary mycotoxicoses
  • Track 26-14Enterotoxins
  • Track 26-15Surveillance of foodborne diseases
  • Track 26-16Agricultural Development
  • Track 26-17 Antimicrobial resistance in the food chain
  • Track 26-18Emerging foodborne pathogens
  • Track 26-19Technology and Industry
  • Track 26-20Food hygiene
  • Track 26-21Symptoms of foodborne illnesses
  • Track 27-1Garlic to combat urinary tract infections
  • Track 27-2Plant microbiome to protect against diseases
  • Track 27-3Ash tree genome aids fight against infectious disease
  • Track 27-4Physical exercise vs diet against diseases
  • Track 27-5Vegetarian diet against infections and disorders
  • Track 27-6Oriental diet pattern to combat risks of eye diseases
  • Track 27-7Communication of Intestinal bacteria and immune system
  • Track 27-8Fiber-rich diet to encounter the arthritis and other disorders
  • Track 27-9Omega-6 fatty acids against against premature death
  • Track 28-1Structure and physiology of Prion
  • Track 28-2Role of prions in other infectious diseases
  • Track 28-3Potential treatments and diagnosis for prion diseases
  • Track 28-4Species barrier and prion diseases spread
  • Track 28-5Immune responses to prion disease
  • Track 28-6Similar infectious diseases as prion diseases
  • Track 28-7Detection and diagnosis of prion diseases
  • Track 28-8Prion diseases animals
  • Track 28-9Evolutionary origins of prion disease
  • Track 28-10Potential therapies and treatments for prion diseases
  • Track 28-11Prion diseases in plants
  • Track 28-12Epidemics of prion diseases and infections
  • Track 28-13Transmission Prion diseases
  • Track 28-14Prion diseases in patients with deficient defenses
  • Track 28-15Molecular Biochemistry of Prion
  • Track 28-16Defenders against prion diseases
  • Track 28-17Host defense against Prion diseases
  • Track 28-18Advanced models of prion diseases

 

<p style="\&quot;text-align:" justify;\"="">\ Emerging Protozoan pathogens and Infectious Diseases session facilitates to discuss the factors driving the appearance, establishment, and spread of emerging, re-emerging and novel protozoan diseases; the global health and economic impacts of recently emerging and novel protozoan diseases; and the scientific and policy approaches to improving domestic and international capacity to detect and respond to global outbreaks of infectious disease.

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  • Track 29-1 Medically important parasitic protozoan
  • Track 29-2Medical protozoology
  • Track 29-3Diagnosis, prevention and treatment of protozoan infections
  • Track 29-4Factors of emergence of protozoan diseases
  • Track 29-5Risks of protozoan infection occurance
  • Track 29-6Protozoan parasite behavior of infected hosts
  • Track 29-7Convergent emergence of protozoan parasite and bacteria
  • Track 29-8Viral symbionts of a protozoan parasites
  • Track 29-9Potential vaccines against protozoan diseases
  • Track 29-10Opportunistic protozoan diseases
  • Track 29-11Intestinal pathogenic protozoan infestation
  • Track 29-12Identification of protozoan parasites
  • Track 29-13Biological and molecular aspects
  • Track 29-14Antiprotozoal agents
  • Track 29-15 Conservative character of medical classification
  • Track 29-16Prevalence emerging protozoan diseases
  • Track 29-17Invasion mechanisms of protozoan parasites
  • Track 29-18Pathogenic and free-living amoebae
  • Track 29-19Drug resistance in protozoan parasites
  • Track 29-20Druggable genome targets