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3rd International Conference on Influenza and Emerging Infectious Diseases, will be organized around the theme

Conceptual Applications to encounter the Influenza & Emerging Infectious Diseases

Influenza Research 2019 is comprised of keynote and speakers sessions on latest cutting edge research designed to offer comprehensive global discussions that address current issues in Influenza Research 2019

Submit your abstract to any of the mentioned tracks.

Register now for the conference by choosing an appropriate package suitable to you.

  • Track 1-1Assays and symptoms
  • Track 1-2Rapid detection methods by PCR
  • Track 1-3Strain identification assays and rapid diagnostic testing for viral infections
  • Track 1-4Biomarkers
  • Track 1-5Diseases with bioterrorism potential
  • Track 1-6Undetectable pathogens

Influenza, commonly called "the flu," is an illness caused by RNA viruses that infect the respiratory tract. The infection results in the person getting a fever, cough, headache and malaise (tired, no energy); some people also may develop a sore throat, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. Influenza viruses are among the most common causes of human respiratory infections, and are also among the most significant because they cause high morbidity and mortality. Influenza outbreaks have apparently occurred since at least the Middle Ages. In the elderly, in infants, and in people with chronic diseases, influenza is associated with especially high mortality. In the United States, flu results in approximately 200,000 hospitalizations and 36,000 deaths in a typical endemic season.

  • Track 2-1Lactic acid bacteria against influenza a virus
  • Track 2-2Medication and therapeutics
  • Track 2-3Pneumonia following influenza
  • Track 2-4Promising influenza study tools
  • Track 2-5Spanish Influenza (Flu)
  • Track 2-6Pandemic Influenza (Flu)
  • Track 2-7Avian Influenza (Flu)
  • Track 2-8Ecological and evolutionary studies of Influenza
  • Track 2-9Drinking and smoking-Incidences influenza (flu) infections
  • Track 2-10Epistasis of Influenza (Flu)
  • Track 2-11Inhibitors of influenza virus
  • Track 2-12MRSA-superbug-influenza
  • Track 2-13Treatment & prevention of influenza (Flu) infection
  • Track 2-14Influenza (Flu) virus-like particles
  • Track 2-15Hijack of human cells by influenza (Flu) virus
  • Track 2-16Influenza vaccination-natural immunity
  • Track 2-17Influenza (Flu) response to new drug
  • Track 2-18Factors affecting influenza (flu) spread
  • Track 2-19Influenza (Flu)-heart attack
  • Track 2-20Development of influenza vaccine components
  • Track 2-21Influenza (Flu) infection in birds
  • Track 2-22Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection

The epidemiology of infectious disease (ID) involves study of the prevalence, incidence and determinants of infections in populations.
Infectious diseases remain one of the most important causes of morbidity and mortality around the world.  In addition to studying the rates of and risk factors for infectious disease, ID epidemiologists implement and evaluate interventions at the individual and community level to:

  • Track 3-1Clinical and medical epidemiology
  • Track 3-2Food borne diseases
  • Track 3-3Biodiversity loss
  • Track 3-4Agricultural Development
  • Track 3-5Changes in Human Demographics and Behavior
  • Track 3-6International Travel and Commerce
  • Track 3-7Technology and Industry
  • Track 3-8Microbial Adaptation and Change
  • Track 3-9Breakdown of Public Health Measures
  • Track 3-10Deficiencies in public health infrastructure
  • Track 3-11Epidemic-Prone Diseases
  • Track 3-12Geographical distribution of infectious diseases
  • Track 3-13Denizens of the microbial world
  • Track 3-14Epidemiological methods
  • Track 3-15Control of infectious disease
  • Track 3-16Molecular epidemiology
  • Track 3-17Cohort studies
  • Track 3-18Descriptive infectious disease epidemiology
  • Track 3-19Emerging pandemic threats
  • Track 3-20Dynamics of Infectious diseases
  • Track 3-21Disease Eradication
  • Track 3-22Spread and evolution of infectious diseases
  • Track 3-23Prevalence of the fungus Fusarium

Clinical study is used to know the clinical descriptions of infections, microbiology, and immunology, the prevention of infection, the evaluation of current and novel treatments, and the promotion of optimal practices for diagnosis and treatment.

  • Track 4-1Medical microbiology
  • Track 4-2Cholera
  • Track 4-3Rabies
  • Track 4-4Smallpox
  • Track 4-5Bubonic Plague
  • Track 4-6Pneumonia
  • Track 4-7Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease
  • Track 4-8Marburg hemorraghic fever
  • Track 4-9Yellow Fever
  • Track 4-10Perinatal Complications
  • Track 4-11Whooping Cough
  • Track 4-12Tetanus
  • Track 4-13Anti-tumor mechanisms & cancer
  • Track 4-14Preventing spread of drug-resistant bacteria
  • Track 4-15Anthrax
  • Track 4-16Zika virus infection
  • Track 4-17Diagnosis & Management
  • Track 4-18Clinical Syndrome
  • Track 4-19Clinical microbiology
  • Track 4-20Lyme disease
  • Track 4-21Malaria
  • Track 4-22Dengue infection
  • Track 4-23HIV/AIDS
  • Track 4-24Streptococcus infection
  • Track 4-25Ear infections
  • Track 4-26Infectious Diarrhea
  • Track 4-27Ebola
  • Track 4-28Hepatitis
  • Track 4-29Zika virus infection
  • Track 4-30Chikungunya virus

Pathological Studies is the branch of science of the causes and effects of diseases, especially the branch of medicine that deals with the laboratory examination of samples of body tissue for diagnostic or forensic purposes. Emerging and reemerging infectious diseases and the threat of bioterrorism call attention to the growing importance of the ability of the anatomic pathologist to recognize infectious diseases. The diagnosis of complex diseases or infections requires the collaborative efforts of clinicians, radiologists, and pathologists.

  • Track 5-1Anatomical Pathology
  • Track 5-2 Specific mechanisms of host resistance
  • Track 5-3Histology of Infectious Diseases
  • Track 5-4Cytopathology of Infectious Diseases
  • Track 5-5Pathophysiology of Actue Viral Infections
  • Track 5-6Bloodstream Infections
  • Track 5-7Infectious Pathogens

Microbiology is the empirical study of the microorganisms. The microbial flora lives in harmony with the healthy individual in order to protect its host from pathogens. Microorganisms are minute living creature such as bacteria and viruses. In spite of their flooded abundance relatively few of the thousands of species of microorganisms invade, multiply, and cause disease in people. Despite all the good things microbe do, when we hear news stories about microbes, it is usually about pathogens. Pathogens are the invading microbes in our bodies that make us sick. It is usually our immune system's reaction to the foreign microbial invaders that give us the lousy symptoms, like a fever or stomach-ache. Different studies are done on different microorganisms. Culturing is the term used to describe growing microbes, usually combined with tests to see what the microbes like to eat or what conditions they can live in. A microbiologist studies the characteristics of pathogens, their modes of transmission, mechanisms of infection and growth. Using this information, a treatment can be devised.

  • Track 6-1Microbial Pathogens
  • Track 6-2Microbial Diseases
  • Track 6-3Advances in Microbiological Techniques
  • Track 6-4Pharmaceutical Microbiology
  • Track 6-5Parasitic Infestation

Infectious diseases represent a major health problem worldwide, both in terms of morbidity and mortality. A complex combination of environmental, pathogen and host genetic factors plays a role in determining both susceptibility to particular microbes and the course of infection. Molecular epidemiology is a discipline that uses molecular or genetic markers to trace the development of a disease in a population and to understand transmission, as well as the population structure and evolution of bacterial pathogens. Infectious diseases represent a major health problem worldwide, both in terms of morbidity and mortality. A complex combination of environmental, pathogen and host genetic factors plays a role in determining both susceptibility to particular microbes and the course of infection.

  • Track 7-1Microbial Agents & Diseases Production
  • Track 7-2Molecular Diagnostic Methods
  • Track 7-3Interactions of Microbial Pathogens
  • Track 7-4Influenza virus RNA: Translation into protein
  • Track 7-5Genetics & Evolution of Infectious Diseases
  • Track 7-6RNA Synthesis
  • Track 7-7Infectious Disease Genomics

Infectious diseases represent an increasingly important cause of human morbidity and mortality throughout the world. Vaccine development and treatment for infectious diseases is thus of great importance in terms of global health. In parallel with this growth, there has been a dramatic increase in studies to identify the innate, humoral or cellular immunological mechanisms which confer immunity to pathogenic viruses, bacteria, fungi and parasites. Immunology describes how the body copes with bacterial, viral, or parasitic infections, cancer, and other diseases. It requires expertise and analysis from the level of the molecules and cells of the immune system all the way up to disease dynamics in populations and ecosystems.

  • Track 8-1Infection & Immunity
  • Track 8-2Host Defense against Infections
  • Track 8-3Immunodeficiencies
  • Track 8-4Immunocompromised Patients
  • Track 8-5Infections in Patients with Deficient Defenses

An infection occurs when the immune system does not quickly destroy harmful substances. Both cancer and cancer treatments weaken the immune system. This means that people with cancer are more likely to develop infections. Cancer and cancer treatments can make it more likely for you to get an infection. Some types of cancers and cancer treatment can weaken your immune system. They stop your bone marrow from making blood cells that help fight infection. This increases your risk of getting an infection. The white blood cells play the biggest part in fighting infection. A low white blood cell count the more risk of getting infections.

  • Track 9-1Epidemiology of infections in Cancer patients
  • Track 9-2Infectious Complications in Cancer patients
  • Track 9-3Advancements in the Management of Viral Infections
  • Track 9-4Adjuvants and their improvement issues
  • Track 9-5Clinical trails of influenza based vaccines
  • Track 9-6Bloodstream Infections in cancer patients
  • Track 9-7Infections in Solid tumor patients
  • Track 9-8Postsurgery Infections in Cancer patients

Pandemic, epidemic and endemic infectious diseases are united by a common problem to identify potential pharmacological interventions to treat infections. The large numbers of emerging and neglected infectious diseases are badly affecting the poorest members of the global society; new ways are required to develop high productivity discovery systems that can be applied to a large number of pathogens. The basis for developing methods to prioritize a priori potential drug targets analyzes the pharmacological landscape of an infectious disease.

  • Track 10-1Antiviral drugs for influenza
  • Track 10-2Antimicrobial Drugs
  • Track 10-3Clinical Trails & Studies
  • Track 10-4Antibiotic and antimicrobial resistance during flu infection
  • Track 10-5National and international surveillance and contingency strategies
  • Track 10-6Herbal Medicines
  • Track 10-7Veterinary Medicines
  • Track 10-8Travel & Tropical Medicines

The word “Antibiotic” has become the most commonly used word to refer to a chemical substance used to treat bacterial infections. The term "antimicrobial" usually refers to anything that prevents the growth of microbes. Technically, the term antimicrobial does not encompass the "anthelminthic" drugs because parasitic worms are not microscopically small. Antimicrobials can be either microstate (preventing the replication of the microbe) or microbicidal (actually killing the target microorganism).

  • Track 11-1Vaccines: Innovations and Advancements
  • Track 11-2Digital Treatment Techniques
  • Track 11-3Therapies & Managements
  • Track 11-4Anti-Infective Therapies
  • Track 11-5Mechanisms of antimicrobial resistance
  • Track 11-6Transfer of antimicrobial-resistance genes
  • Track 11-7Antimicrobial Therapies

Hospital Acquired Infections (HAIs) also known as nosocomial infections and caused by viral, bacterial, and fungal pathogens cause or contribute up to 100,000 deaths each year. Gram-negative bacterial infections are estimated to account for two-thirds of the 25,000 deaths each year. Bloodstream infection (BSI), pneumonia, ventilator-associated pneumonia [VAP], urinary tract infection (UTI), and surgical site infection (SSI) are the most common type of hospital-acquired infections. Theses hospital-acquired infections also can be occurred in, nursing home, rehabilitation facility, outpatient clinic and other clinical settings.

  • Track 14-1Presurgical Multifaceted intervention
  • Track 14-2Occurrence of hospital acquired infections
  • Track 14-3Treatment and prevention of hospital acquired infections
  • Track 14-4Catheter related bloodstream infections
  • Track 14-5Emergency and essential health care
  • Track 14-6Leading pathogens causing hospital acquired infection
  • Track 14-7Chlorhexidine gluconate bath usage
  • Track 14-8Screening tools
  • Track 14-9Gene Technology to fight against hospital acquired infection
  • Track 14-10Risk factors in Hospital acquired infetions
  • Track 14-11Wound contamination and surgical site infections
  • Track 14-12Ventilator associated pneumonia
  • Track 14-13Informatics tools
  • Track 14-14Level hospital infection risk
  • Track 14-15Molecular network
  • Track 14-16Nanofiber-based wound dressings
  • Track 14-17Multidrug resistant infections
  • Track 14-18Nosocomial infection
  • Track 14-19Xenotransplantation and transplantation
  • Track 14-20Surgical site infections
  • Track 14-21Epidemiology of hospital acquired infections

Pediatrics is the field of medicine that deals with the medical care of the infants, children and adolescents. A child suffering from a persistent disease caused by an infectious agent like bacteria, fungi or parasite is called as pediatric infectious disease. All children deserve high-quality medical care. It is crucial to be aware about the treatment guideline of pediatrics so that every child gets the right treatment. There are many prevention ways to protect children from infective diseases.

  • Track 15-1Pediatric Immunizations
  • Track 15-2Bacterial infectious diseases
  • Track 15-3Viral infectious diseases
  • Track 15-4Pneumonia in children
  • Track 15-5Metapneumoviral infection
  • Track 15-6Abnormal pregnancies-fetal death
  • Track 15-7Immunocompromise
  • Track 15-8Chlamydia trachomatis
  • Track 15-9Infection control & prevention
  • Track 15-10Antibiotic gel-ear infections
  • Track 15-11Childhood infections
  • Track 15-12Kawasaki Disease
  • Track 15-13Fungal infections
  • Track 15-14Infections of the Fetus
  • Track 15-15Acquired Neonatal Infections
  • Track 15-16Infectious Disease in Child Abuse
  • Track 15-17Clinical Approach to the infected Neonate
  • Track 15-18Mechanism of Pediatric Infectious Disease
  • Track 15-19Pediatric HIV
  • Track 15-20Effects of antibiotics in children
  • Track 15-21Multi-drug resistant infections
  • Track 15-22Lyme disease
  • Track 15-23Staph bone infections

Gastrointestinal infections are among the most commonly encountered infections in primary care. While they may not always be severe and may often resolve rapidly, they can be serious in specific healthcare settings or patient populations. Gastrointestinal infections can be caused by a large number of microorganisms, including: Adenovirus, Campylobacter, Clostridium difficile, Escherichia coli, Helicobacter pylori, Rotavirus, Salmonella and Shigella, Staphylococcus aureus, Yersinia enterocolitica.

  • Track 16-1Viral Gastroenteritis
  • Track 16-2Diagnosis & Management of GTI
  • Track 16-3Infalmmatory Enteritis
  • Track 16-4Pancreatic Infections
  • Track 16-5Prevention of Gastroenteritis Pathogens

It is important to differentiate between the sexually transmitted disease and sexually transmitted infections. The STDs are the medical infections that are transmitted through sexual contact. But people who got infected, don’t always encounter any symptoms or develop their infection into a disease. That’s what the term “STI” is. Approximately all the STIs spread through the contact with infected body fluids such as blood, vaginal fluid or semen. Some bacterial STDs like Chlamydia, Gonorrhea etc. can be controlled but not cured and if anyone gets the viral STD like HIV/AIDS, Genital herpes etc., they are always going to have it. Young people are at greatest risk of sexually transmitted infections.

  • Track 17-1Microbial transmission
  • Track 17-2HIV/AIDS
  • Track 17-3Contraceptives
  • Track 17-4Epidemiological Diagnosis
  • Track 17-5Partner Therapy
  • Track 17-6¬†Vaccines & Treatments

Viral and immune mediated disorders of the nervous system are among the most challenging neurological disorders. The most common neuroimmune disorder is multiple sclerosis; and HIV is the most common viral infection of the nervous system. The progressive loss of neurons, resulting in significant cognitive and motor dysfunction. A major focus of researchers is to understand the pathophysiology of neuronal injury associated with these disorders to develop new diagnostic markers, therapeutic targets, and new areas of research applicable to other neurodegenerative diseases. Neurological infections occur when these viruses and organisms invade the nervous system. Neuroinfectious diseases affect the nervous system, from the brain and spinal cord to muscles and nerves. There are a wide range of neuroinfectious diseases, including:
Meningitis and encephalitis, Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy, HIV-associated neurodegeneration, Neurosarcoidosis, HTLV 1 myelopathy hereditary spastic paraparesis, Transverse myelitis.

  • Track 18-1Nervous System Infections
  • Track 18-2Etological Agents
  • Track 18-3Diagnosis & Prevention
  • Track 18-4Infections after neurological operations
  • Track 18-5Neurological aspects of Infectious Diesase
  • Track 18-6Types of Neurological Infections
  • Track 18-7Diagnosis and Treatment

The dermatological infectious disease is generally defined as the skin infections caused by bacteria fungi and other microorganisms. The infectious disease diagnosis on molecular level is developing notably over the past decade. The dermatologic disease diagnosis involve many different new and advanced techniques like transcription-mediated amplification, nucleic-acid sequence based amplification, polymerase chain reaction, ligase chain reaction etc. The operating cost of these techniques are decreasing with time as well as acquiring approval of U.S. Food and Drug Administration and getting easier and more effective to use. In the future, it has been expected that these techniques will be able to provide fast and accurate diagnosis of infectious diseases in a single clinical visit. Patients with HIV, the virus that causes AIDS are at an increased risk for developing a variety of skin problems or diseases because of their compromised immune system.

  • Track 19-1Cutaneous, Subcutaneous Infections
  • Track 19-2Parasitic Infestations
  • Track 19-3Soft tissue Infections
  • Track 19-4Dermatologic Manifestations of Infections
  • Track 19-5Cellulitis & Myositis

Lung diseases are some of the most common medical conditions in the world. Tens of millions of people suffer from lung disease in the U.S. Smoking, infections, and genetics are responsible for most lung diseases. Lung infectious disease is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with primary immunodeficiencies and other conditions that alter immunologic mechanisms against microbial invasion. Lung infectious diseases occurring in patients with congenital immunodeficiency and patients on treatment with biologic anti-inflammatory compounds are discussed. Understanding of the complex relationships between the immune system and microbes is of paramount importance for timely diagnosis and successful treatment of lung infectious diseases in this group of immunocompromised hosts.

  • Track 20-1Cystic Fibrosis Pulmonary Infections
  • Track 20-2Asthma treatment
  • Track 20-3Vaccines vs antibiotics
  • Track 20-4Cigarette smoke effect on respiratory system
  • Track 20-5Inhaled steroid effect on respiratory system
  • Track 20-6Zinc supply mechanism role in lung infections
  • Track 20-7Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis
  • Track 20-8Lung organoids
  • Track 20-9Aerosol effect on Respiratory system
  • Track 20-10Cystic fibrosis-lung infections
  • Track 20-11Liver role in pneumonia
  • Track 20-12Prevalence of lung diseases in diabetes people
  • Track 20-13Reprogramming immune cells to encounter TB
  • Track 20-14Risk factors to occur lung infections
  • Track 20-15Chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases
  • Track 20-16Community Accquired Pneumonia
  • Track 20-17Atypical Pulmonary Infections
  • Track 20-18Upper Airway Infections
  • Track 20-19Lower Airway Infections
  • Track 20-20Diagnosis, prevention and medication of lung diseases
  • Track 20-21Tonsil & adenoid role in respiration
  • Track 20-22Congenital lung disorders
  • Track 20-23Pulmonary fungal infections
  • Track 20-24Tuberculosis (TB) Pulmonary Diseases
  • Track 20-25Defense Mechanisms of the respiratory System
  • Track 20-26Lung infections in leukemia patients
  • Track 20-27Valley fever

The ophthalmic infectious diseases are the infections caused in eye by the different microorganisms. The generally caused ophthalmic infectious diseases are Conjunctivitis, Stye, Periorbital cellulitis, Herpes simplex keratitis etc. The retina and the choroids are expensively vascularized structures and can accordingly be colonized by germs by the hematogenous route. Ocular candidiasis is outstanding amongst these colonization’s because of its frequency; it can manifest itself as an endophthalmitis with a slow and hidden course. The so-called ocular histoplasmosis syndrome, although it is infrequent in our setting, is an important cause of choroidal neovascularization.

  • Track 21-1Ocular Infections
  • Track 21-2Artists and eye diseases
  • Track 21-3Early detection of eye diseases
  • Track 21-4Congenital Zika virus syndrome
  • Track 21-5Endophthalmitis
  • Track 21-6Algorithms to detect eye diseases
  • Track 21-7Corneal inflammation
  • Track 21-8Corneal inflammation
  • Track 21-9Microcephaly
  • Track 21-10Smoking effect on eyes
  • Track 21-11Detection, prevention & medication of Glaucoma
  • Track 21-12Electronic health records (EHR)
  • Track 21-13Healthy diet medication to lower eye disease risk
  • Track 21-14Risk factors for ophthalmoscopic
  • Track 21-15Personalize diagnosis and treatment of eye diseases
  • Track 21-16Immunotherapy & antiviral therapy
  • Track 21-17Brain diseases-pathological changes in the retina
  • Track 21-18Immuno-ophthalmology
  • Track 21-19Molecular Diagnosis & Treatments
  • Track 21-20Infection of the Posterior Segment
  • Track 21-21Emergent Ocular Infections
  • Track 21-22Conjunctivitis
  • Track 21-23Therapies & Treatments
  • Track 21-24Eye diseases-sleep disorders
  • Track 21-25Microbial keratitis
  • Track 21-26Retinal diseases
  • Track 21-27Corneal transplants
  • Track 21-28Eye microbiota
  • Track 21-29 Toxoplasma infection
  • Track 21-30 Toxoplasma infection
  • Track 21-31Contact lens and eye infections
  • Track 21-32Drugs and eye disorders

Knowledge of infectious diseases that can spread between animals or even between animals and humans is critical to the field of veterinary medicine.  Zoonosis is the formal term for an animal disease that can spread to humans, such as rabies. The diagnosis of diseases in food producing animals, companion animals, zoo animals and wildlife. Veterinary medicine is usually carried out with or without professional administration. The professional care is generally performed by Veterinary physicians. The veterinary pathologists also play a key role in the drug discovery and safety as well as scientific research. The veterinary pathologists are eligible to be appointed on many different positions which include the pharmaceutical industry, medical teaching, research, and diagnostic pathology.

  • Track 22-1Parthenogenesis and Virulence in Zoonoses
  • Track 22-2Rodent-borne zoonotic diseases
  • Track 22-3Monitoring of zoonotic diseases
  • Track 22-4Wildlife and climate roles in zoonotic diseases
  • Track 22-5Influential geo-spatial factors of zoonotic diseases
  • Track 22-6Species-jumping infectious diseases
  • Track 22-7Models for infectious disease studies
  • Track 22-8 Zoonotic Viruses
  • Track 22-9Wildlife disease & wildlife conservation
  • Track 22-10Antimicrobial resistance in zoonotic bacteria
  • Track 22-11Detection of human-animal diseases
  • Track 22-12Veterinary medicine
  • Track 22-13Globalization zoonotic diseases
  • Track 22-14Tick-borne zoonotic diseases
  • Track 22-15Emerging zoonotic diseases from pets
  • Track 22-16Xenotransplantation
  • Track 22-17Food-borne zoonotic diseases
  • Track 22-18Non-food-borne zoonotic diseases
  • Track 22-19Bioterrorism of Zoontic Diseases
  • Track 22-20Prevention and control of zoonotic diseases
  • Track 22-21Economic & trade implications
  • Track 22-22Bacterial infectious diseases
  • Track 22-23Mycotic infectious diseases
  • Track 22-24Viral infectious diseases
  • Track 22-25Emerging vector-borne zoonotic diseases
  • Track 22-26Hot-spots of human-animal zoonotic diseases and emerging disease
  • Track 22-27Prediction of zoonotic diseases outbreaks
  • Track 22-28Overabundant of wildlife communities

Developed countries have regulations that help to protect the general public from infectious diseases. Public health measures typically involve eliminating the pathogen from the reservoir or from its route of transmission. The measures include ensuring a safe water supply, effectively managing sewage treatment and disposal, and initiating food safety, animal control, and vaccination programs. Influenza drug effectivity is evaluated in clinical trials conducted within the setting of current,  naturally occurring influenza illness. However, a drug effective within the treatment of seasonal  influenza might not be effective or as effective in pandemic influenza or in sporadic cases caused by alternative novel strains. Avian influenza, listed by the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE),  has become an illness of nice importance for animal and human health.

  • Track 25-1Spread and Evolution of Infectious Diseases
  • Track 25-2Zoonotic Infection
  • Track 25-3Inequality, Political Ecology and the Future of Infectious Diseases
  • Track 25-4Denizens of the Microbial World
  • Track 25-5Climatic conditions for Infectious Diseases
  • Track 25-6Geographical Distribution of Infectious Diseases
  • Track 25-7Infections on Global Impact